The clay place


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Monday, May 29, 2017

Rogers from Italy to England: John Fitz Roger, Gentleman

I left off yesterday with the first Rogers in England, Aaron Fitz Roger (abt. 1249-1335).  [WARNING FLAG...people didn't live into their nineties in those days often! I would guess some of his dates aren't right.]

He married Gonnora Crepon, 1240-1313.
There's even family crest for the Crepon family.


















Aaron's son was...
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"Aaron II (or John) Fitz Roger
"born the latter part of the thirteenth century in Italy - of Norman parentage, probably ab. 1260-70, removed with his family, embracing at least two sons, to London, England; where he continued his business of merchandising.

One son is thought to have located on a small country seat, some 5 mi. south of Maidstone in Co. Kent; and another certainly went to Gloucestershire, seeking a location; and this latter son of Aaron or John aforesaid (or possibly a son of his), finally located in Somersetshire."

John Cox Underwood
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" Fitz " means " Son of." It is old English and sometimes incorrectly associated with being illegitimate.
Aaron III (or John) Fitz Roger was born around 1300 and lived and died in Somersetshire, England.  If wives and mothers in these times were not royal they were lost to any recorded history.

Son of Aaron III (John) Fitz Roger was John Fitz Roger, Gentleman...
"b. ab. 1335 in England, feathered his nest luxuriantly by m. Elizabeth, b. 1330, dau. of Sir Symon de Furneaux, of Ashington & and other manors in Somersetshire, Devonshire, &c.; wid. of Sir John Blount, Constable of the Tower.  Dame Elizabeth was the very wealthy Furneaux heiress, holding by entailure vast realty possessions; and as she was the co-founder with her 2d. husband of the recognized 'Rogers House' of South West England, it is fitting that her ancestral Pedigree shall be recorded here in sufficient detail to show the origin, influence, and power of the Furneaux's..."

John Cox Underwood
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Their home was
Bryanstone House 1

"The original village of Bryanston lay in the vicinity of the church, now the Portman Chapel, at the mouth of a dry valley. In mediaeval times it was a relatively large settlement; twenty-three taxpayers are recorded in the 1333 Subsidy Rolls (P.R.O., E. 179/103/5), but in 1662 the number of households had dwindled to six (Meekings, 69). Early in the 18th century the site of the village was occupied by a large house and its dependencies, the seat of the Berkeley Portman family from the 17th century onwards. In 1778 the house was demolished and replaced by another, and in 1890 this house was in turn demolished and replaced by the great mansion which still stands some 500 yds. to the N.W. of the first site. It is now part of Bryanston School. In 1898 a new parish church was built on or very near the site of the former houses.

The house demolished in 1778 is known from J. Kip's engraving (Britannia Illustrata, 1714, pl. 77) and from a perspective view included in Bastard's plan of Blandford Forum (Plate 104). Kip shows it as standing about 50 yds. S. of the old church. [Probably the illustration that came from Ancestry which is shown above.]

Earthwork Remains (875073) of gardens and outbuildings of the house which preceded that of 1778 lie on land which slopes gently E. to the R. Stour. Low banks and scarps, much obscured by later work, and rectangular platforms, appear to represent the northern third of the gardens and outbuildings of the house depicted by J. Kip (loc. cit.); presumably they were abandoned c. 1778.
Source: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/rchme/dorset/vol3
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The presumed all-male line from HIALTI DE HAUTEVILLE to JOHN ROGERS the martyr

1. Hialti de Hauteville, b. ca. 852
2. Guicard de Hauteville, b. ca. 880
3. Tancred de Hauteville, b. ca. 905
4. Gerard Tancred, b. ca. 930
5. Rabel Tancred de Hauteville, b. ca. 950
6. Seigneur Tancreed de Hauteville, b. ca. 970, of Normandy, France, m. Fredistina de Hauteville
7. Robert I de Hauteville, b. ca. 1025, m. Adelisia de Savona
8. Roger, b. 1093, m. Albertz
9. Son Roger, b. ca. 1145, m. Albertz
10. Tancreed, b. ca. 1171, m. Sybil d'Aquina
11. Son Tancreed, b. ca. 1197
12. Grandson Tancreed, b. ca. 1223
13. Aaron FitzRogers, b. ca. 1249, Rome,Italy
14. Aaron FitzRogers, b. 1275
15. Aaron FitzRogers, b. ca. 1300
16. John FitzRogers, b. 1335, England, m. Elizabeth Furneaux
17. John FitzRogers, b. 1386, m. Agnes Mordaunt
18. Thomas Rogers, b. 1408, m. Elizabeth Hungerford
19. Thomas Rogers, b. ca. 1435, m. Catherine Courtenay
20. Thomas Rogers, b. ca. 1485, m. Margaret Wyatt
21. Rev. John Rogers(The Martyr), b. 1506/7, m. Adriana Alids de Weyden Pratt 


And I'm so glad that the last paragraph lists all the Rogers line and their birth dates.  It is so much easier for me to understand.  I acknowledge that having some connection through the various marriages might be of interest to some, but I got a bit confused in all the Burke's details. 

I will post more information on Elizabeth de Furneaux soon!


But these are the sources of information that is behind all those little trees on Ancestry!

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