Thursday, July 2, 2015

Spontaneous visit to Penland

We were driving from Burnsville to Spruce-Pine (North Carolina) and had to detour up to Penland since it was almost on the way.  And Cathy had never been there.

Why not?  There were no time deadlines, and we just ate lunch at the Garden Deli in Burnsville.  I'm going to see if I can find somewhere else to eat next trip...just saying, it's ok, but I want some diversity.
Where the huge willow used to be, there's a replacement planted at the Garden Deli.

The last few times I've driven to Penland I've gone the route through Spruce-Pine, so missed seeing this decrepit barn, and its stage of decay.

Before we went to pick up our unsold mugs at Twisted Laurel Gallery, we just went to see the Penland gallery, and the beautiful views of Penland.

Penland Gallery


And the Penland Gallery building is being renovated, so this is the temporary quarters for the gallery exhibits, about half as big as the former floor space.  But we were told the renovations should be done sometime in the fall.

We didn't visit much of the school of crafts, but I enjoyed taking a few pictures of areas I wasn't as familiar with.  See my blog posts from yesterday and tomorrow!
The Penland dining hall

I'm linking this to Sepia Saturday for this week...though it hasn't a thing to do with the theme which is fishy.

Wait wait, while we were driving through Madison County (NC) we started looking for The Bridges of Madison County (movie with Clint Eastwood and Meryl Streep) and so everytime we crossed a bridge, we'd call out...It's a bridge of Madison County!

What do bridges have to do with fish?  Well, a few of them crossed over the South Toe River, which not only has lovely swimming this time of year, but quite a few trout! 



Today's Quote:


People often say that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder,” and I say that the most liberating thing about beauty is realizing that you are the beholder. This empowers us to find beauty in places where others have not dared to look, including inside ourselves.
Salma Hayek



22 comments:

  1. so many deteriorating buildings I hate to see them like that, long forgotten and seldom used.

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    1. I always like to see how they collapse and go back to nature, but I get to see all the construction and remember that it was a building built by a farmer, and maybe friends or sons...an indigenous architecture of their needs.

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  2. Very interesting, great photos. We have a town named Burnsville about 12 miles from me! In Minnesota.

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    1. It's really confusing around here, Burnsville is near Bakersville, and also another B-ville that I can't think of right now.

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  3. Love the Penland area. Alas, the Bridges of Madison County are in Iowa, not NC. But you did go over bridges in Madison County nonetheless.

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    1. I have such fun friends...Cathy was the one who started telling me about each bridge. I was a stickler, asking why we couldn't at least find one covered bridge. But then I admitted that I've been to a covered bridge in NC, somewhere over near Seagrove.

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  4. I have several old pictures of covered bridges in Tuolumne County, CA, but there are few left anymore & those that are still standing are very popular draws.

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    1. I need to dig out my old pics of the covered bridge I found near Uwharrie National Forest.

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  5. Wrong county, wrong state. I bet you knew that didn't you. I live within and hour from the Bridges of Madison County. My sister in law lives in Winterset, Iowa and the bridges are all along the way in the rural roads. Most all are gravel roads. It is nice to take a side road once in a while, when you have the time for it.

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    1. OOOh, lucky you to have the real Madison County bridges to see...I hope they are maintained!
      We were fortunate that the NC road we were on has recently been (mostly) widened so we were able to get to Burnsville from Black Mountain, NC in an hour...then we ran into a bit of roadwork but didn't have to stop, just lost our 4 lanes. There were still bridges, but by then we were in Yancy County...home of Spruce-Pine and many potters.

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  6. Fish swim in rivers under bridges - three degrees of separation. That's a good enough connection to the theme photo for me :-} Lovely pictures.

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    1. You can come on a day trip with me anytime!

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  7. I was wondering what the connection was but bridges are definitely linked to fishing :)

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  8. Nice photos anyway, even if they have little to do with the theme prompt. I often find myself straying far from the bidden path too.

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  9. It looks very beautiful countryside :)

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  10. That stone staircase at Penland really caught my eye -- very nice! I've always wanted to travel that part of the US; if I do, I'll be sure to notify you beforehand! What fun THAT would be -- Sepians connecting!

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  11. I've never been to Penland but I've heard a lot about it from my daughter, who is also a potter. Also never seen a covered bridge, although I've seen a picture of one in Michigan that I should have seen.

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  12. I haven't been to North Carolina, or Iowa either fir that matter, but I do have a photo of one of several covered bridges we drove through near Quebec.Nothing like that here in Aus as far as I know.and i guess you can't fish out of them, but in any event a lot of open bridges forbid fishing off them too.

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    1. ps. Being a potter, you might enjoy seeing the little clay fish box that I just remembered and added a pihoto of to my SS blog.

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  13. We have a Madison County in Virginia too.
    I'm guessing there must be some pottery on display at the gallery??

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